Enterprise Diversified, Inc. v. Woodmont Lexington, LLC

Previously regarding Sitestar (now known as Enterprise Diversified or ENDI but still trading as SYTE), we had a post in 2016 about the activist takeover as well as an interview in Oddball Stocks Newsletter with the new management.

The company put out an 8-K today regarding a dispute with (and lawsuit filed against) the manager that took control of Mt. Melrose, LLC (its divested real estate division in Lexington, Kentucky) in July:
This morning, Wednesday, November 20, 2019, Enterprise Diversified, Inc. (the “Company”) filed a verified complaint in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware commencing a civil action against Woodmont Lexington, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Woodmont”).

As previously reported in the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 3, 2019, the Company had sold to Woodmont, on June 27, 2019, 65% of the Company’s membership interest in Mt Melrose, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (“Mt Melrose”), which, as has been previously reported, owns and operates a portfolio of income-producing real estate in Lexington, Kentucky. Since the closing of the Mt Melrose transaction, Woodmont, by its representative, Tice Brown, has made repeated offers to buy out the Company’s remaining interest in Mt Melrose. Woodmont’s most recent offer was received by the Company, in writing, on November 11, 2019, with a deadline for acceptance of 9:00 a.m. Monday, November 18, 2019. All such offers have been rejected or not responded to by the Company, as being unfavorable, undesirable and not in the long-term best interests of the Company and its shareholders.

The present action was filed by the Company in response to repeated claims and demands and injurious conduct by Woodmont and its representative, Tice Brown. The Company is seeking, among other relief available, injunctive, declaratory and equitable relief against Woodmont, along with attorneys’ fees and expenses.
The LLC agreement between Woodmont Lexington, LLC and Enterprise Diversified, Inc. is available as an exhibit here. And here is the most recent investor presentation of ENDI, from November 14th.

The docket shows that Enterprise Diversified has filed a Verified Complaint for Injunctive Relief (Confidential Filing), a Motion for Temporary Restraining Order, and a Motion for Expedited Proceedings, as well as a Brief in Support of those Motions, plus various other documents like proposed Orders. Some of these documents were filed under seal, but the two motions can be seen below:

201911201503 by Nate Tobik on Scribd
The case is currently assigned to Delaware Court of Chancery Vice Chancellor J. Travis Laster. We read a lot of his decisions for the "Delaware Chancery Corner" section of the Oddball Stocks Newsletter - he is extremely sharp. 

Life Insurance Company of Alabama

Life Insurance Company of Alabama (LICOA) is a micro cap insurance company with two share classes, one of which (LINS, the fully voting shares) trades at a modest (~20%) discount to book value and the other of which (LINSA, with limited voting rights) trades at a gigantic (>50%) discount to book value. Note that in addition to the voting rights difference, the LINS shares have 5x the economic interest of the LINSA shares.

The company was written up on Value Investors Club and the story is broadly the same as it was then. Despite the big gap between the trading price and book value per share, management is not buying back any stock, and the valuation gap is not closing.

The State of Alabama Department of Insurance periodically examines the insurance companies that are licensed there and publishes a report about them. It is a report that is very helpful for gleaning more information about an insurance company, and helps fill in the gaps between what is in LICOA's bare-bones annual report or even in its annual and quarterly statements filed with the NAIC.

The old reports are not available on the Department of Insurance website, but they are available to anyone who writes in and asks for them. (And pays $1 per page.) The examination report on LICOA from May 2005 has some interesting revelations on the conduct of the family that controls and manages the company:

“It was noted that Rosalie F. Renfrow was hired as a management trainee in September 2002. Ms. Renfrow is the daughter of Raymond Rudolph Renfrom, Jr., a director, officer and stockholder of the Company and Anne Daugette Renfrow, a director of the Company. Ms. Renfrow's monthly salary for 2002, 2003 and 2004 was $1,900, $2,000 and $2,300, respectively, with her salary being increased in September of each year. Ms. Renfrow is also receiving a monthly automobile allowance. This allowance was $300 per month in January and February 2003 and increased to $550 per month for the remainder of the examination period. Ms. Renfrow did not keep regular business hours at the Company – it was noted by examiners that she was routinely not in the office.”

“Company management is not avoiding the appearance of impropriety. If Ms. Renfrow is being developed for a managerial position, she needs a defined job and training program. Due to nepotism within the Company, the Company's President should either actively supervise the training (before it happens, while it is happening, and after the fact) or delegate it where possible. Ms. Renfrow should report to the manager of each department in which she is training. The examiners find it highly unusual that a recent college graduate would be allowed to set their own schedule while receiving a full-time management salary. The preceding report of examination noted an issue with nepotism and this issue stands to harm the Company due to potential shareholder and/or policyholder lawsuits. It is imperative that the Company avoid the appearance of impropriety with the payment of salaries to family members. Ms. Renfrow should maintain working hours comparable to other employees of the Company and report to someone other than her father, Mr. Raymond Renfrow, in order to avoid internal control weaknesses and the appearances of improprieties.”

It is pretty amazing to see a report by a state regulator pointing out behavior by small company management that could cause "shareholder lawsuits". For one thing, only a certain subset of companies have their operations holistically assessed by a regulator: banks and insurance companies are two. And even then, the reports by bank regulators are not usually going to be seen by investors.

One wonders what was in the "preceding report of examination" as well? Meanwhile, here is the full report from 2003 as well as an excerpt with the section called "Other Compensation Issues".

The Problem With "Sum of the Parts"

A version of this essay appeared in Oddball Stocks Newsletter Issue 26. Stay tuned for the upcoming Issue 27 in about a month.

In a finance Twitter discussion about investment theses that revolve around sum-of-the-parts (SOTP) valuations, one astute person pointed out a big problem with these SOTP ideas: the “sum” rarely subtracts the net present value of the corporate overhead.

We have been seeing this problem with a lot of Oddballs recently. For example, Pardee Resources is focused on (mis)-allocating capital to new investments to justify their high SG&A expense, rather than selling timberland at once a millenium high cash flow multiples, cutting SG&A, and buying back stock. The result won't be pretty. Pardee's SG&A expense, meanwhile, is almost $7 million. Is this a perpetuity paid to headquarters staff? What is the appropriate discount rate to capitalize it? Whatever variables you plug into the calculation, the NPV is an unfortunately high fraction of Pardee's asset value.

Or take Avalon Holdings, which we have written about in the Newsletter before. The market capitalization of $7.8 million is only 21% of the book value of $37 million. Avalon is cheap relative to book value, but its assets don't produce much in the way of earnings. The balance sheet shows $73.1 million of assets (of which $46.8 million is property and equipment) financed with $13 million of debt, $21 million of current liabilities, and then the shareholders (and non-controlling interests') equity. These assets only produced $51,000 of operating income (EBIT) for the first six months of 2019!

The pattern at Avalon is that the company has been acquiring properties (like the Boardman Tennis Center last year for $1.3 million) and putting them in a vehicle whose equity trades at 21 cents on the dollar (of book value) and where the cash produced is eaten up by SG&A expense.

In general, these companies at discounts to sum-of-the-parts values (but not cheap based on dividends or cash flows) are suffering from an incentive alignment problem. Managements could stop buying assets, sell overpriced (i.e. low earnings relative to purported asset value) ones to third-parties, and return capital to shareholders. But managements need to own assets to justify being paid. And managers with bigger empires get paid more. (See our post, Small Companies (like Small Banks) As "Jobs Programs".)

With valuations at all-time highs and interest rates at all-time lows, there has never been a better time to sell assets and probably never a worse time to buy them. In Issue 26 of the Oddball Stocks Newsletter, one of our guest writers pointed out reason for the problems at diversified holding companies run by "capital allocators". We are at a cyclical extreme in what people are willing to pay for income generating assets, which explains the dearth of attractive “opcos” for capital allocators to buy. That is ultimately why the book value of Enterprise Diversified dropped to $10.7 million from $19.4 million a year ago.

We continue to see Oddballs – whether land-heavy companies, small banks, or other kinds – that trade for prices below liquidation value if managements sold and yet above the present value, at a reasonable interest rate, of the distributions that shareholders will likely receive over time.

Another problem we see is that investors have abdicated from supervision of their hired managements. Frankly, they are too cheap to engage in “activism” (as shareholder supervision is now known) because they had good results in the past without having to exert control over their investments.

This too shall pass. In the next bear market, micro-cap funds established post-crisis that take too much risk, older investors, and over-leveraged companies themselves will be forced sellers of Oddball shares at much lower prices. That is when it will pay to have studied and read about these companies.

Looking at the Hanover Foods Corporation Annual Results for 2019

Hanover Foods is a classic Oddball that has been written about on this blog a number of times over the years: the original posts (parts 1 and 2) back in 2012, and an update in 2013, among other mentions.

Over the past year and a half we've been writing about Hanover Foods Corporation (HNFSA/HNFSB) pretty frequently in the Oddball Stocks Newsletter. Will anything ever change there? Will value ever be realized? Both of its classes of stock have been in a slump and are back to where they were in 2011-2012. (Of course they have each been paying a small dividend of about $1.10 annually along the way.)

The annual report for the year ending June 2, 2019 just arrived in the mail. The market capitalization is now about $60 million, compared with net current assets of $127 million and common shareholders' equity of $229 million.

The common shareholders' equity is now $320 per share. This is up from the $250 per share when the idea was first written about on Oddball Stocks. Even ignoring goodwill and intangible assets the book value would be $309 per share - almost four times the price of the nonvoting A shares.

However one of our concerns has been that the Hanover business seems to be deteriorating. For this fiscal year, gross profit was $31.8 million, down from $40.8 million the prior year - a decrease of 22 percent. Operating profit dropped from $7 million to only $354,000.

Looking at the cash flow statement, the company had $17 million of depreciation and amortization over the two most recent fiscal years, but spent $25.3 million on purchases of property, plant, and equipment. That $8 million dollar difference was paid for essentially by liquidation of inventory over the most recent fiscal year.

Why was Hanover's profitability so poor? We know from the report that frozen and canned vegetable sales were up a little bit, but snack sales were down from $51.6 million to $44.6 million. Perhaps this segment was higher margin. It seems to consist of snacks like pretzels and cheese balls.

The annual report mentions that last June the company impaired the full amount of the goodwill associated with its snack foods reporting unit. Hanover also "ceased operating its direct store delivery business," resulting in an additional impairment of $2.1 million of intangible assets. These noncash charges drove up administrative expense and so are responsible for a fair bit of the year-over-year decline in profitability.

Hanover's business just seems to be in steady long-term decline. Between 2000 and 2004 sales were lower than today but gross margin was much higher, resulting in some decent profits. Hanover's market capitalization probably wouldn't be $60 million if it were still earning $10 million like it did in 2003 and 2004.

From 2000-2004, Hanover earned an average net income of almost $9 million: higher absolute profits on revenues that were only three-quarters of the current levels. One wonders how much of the declining profit margin is secular business decline and how much (if any) is coming from excessive insider compensation or expenses being run through the business.

On the plus side, since the market capitalization is only 26% of its shareholder equity, the low return on equity transforms into a shareholder earnings yield almost four times higher. (Of course there is the risk that the current, low profitability levels will deteriorate further or become losses...)

We have seen in the past that “one-day” good events can happen for shareholders of companies where the market price is too dislocated from asset values. And we have also seen low returns on equity turn into respectable IRRs for shareholders who buy in at very big discounts to book value. And one other thing worth mentioning – Hanover was probably the most hated Oddball at our Newsletter meetup this year. There was only one gentleman willing to raise his hand to say he had not given up on it!

We have written about Hanover in a number of recent Issues of the Newsletter (back Issues are here) and will continue to do so going forward.

Vulcan International Corp. Timberlands Listed for Sale!

A fellow Oddball sent in a new development for Vulcan International, the previously mentioned (in 2015 and 2018) Oddball that announced plans to liquidate last year but has not announced any progress with the liquidation or paid any distributions.

One of the company's assets is 14k acres of land and timber in the UP of Michigan. This has been placed on the market, with bids due on October 11th:
THE OFFERING
American Forest Management, Inc. (AFM) has been retained to solicit sealed bids for 14,306± gross GIS acres of land and timber located in Houghton and Ontonagon Counties, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. This high-quality property will be offered for sale in its entirety as a lump sum, single-phase, sealed bid event. Offers will not be considered for individual tracts.

THE PROPERTY
Vulcan is located about 25 miles south of Houghton in the area of Twin Lakes. This property is known to be a well-managed, high quality Sugar Maple forest. The Upper Great Lakes Region has numerous markets for many forest products, and Vulcan is well-positioned to take advantage of these markets. The property has an improved road system throughout, allowing for both summer and winter harvesting with little immediate investment. The productive acres of the property are better than average with less than 1% being non-forested.

DATA ROOM
AFM has set up an electronic data room containing information for bidders to use as they evaluate the property. Access to the data room will be permitted only to prospective bidders who have executed a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) as approved by AFM. The data room will be accessible to such prospective bidders starting on August 30, 2019.

OFFERING PROCESS
Vulcan is being presented for sale in its entirety, as a single stage, lump sum sealed bid event, with no further option to subdivide. Prospective bidders are invited to participate in the process upon execution of the NDA. Final bids will be due October 11, 2019.
There is also a short video of the Vulcan land with drone footage.

Lately the share price of Vulcan has been declining. It peaked at $140 last October but has dropped to $120, possibly reflecting concern about the lack of updates on the liquidation.We know that shareholders have been contacting the company and at least one sent a formal Section 220 request for information about what is going on.

(P.S. The timber sale will also be interesting because the value it puts on northern Michigan timber will be helpful in thinking about what Keweenaw Land Association's timber is worth.)

Just Published: Issue 26 of the Oddball Stocks Newsletter

Happy Friday to all Oddballs!

Just a quick note that we have published Issue 26 of the Newsletter this afternoon. If you are a subscriber, it should be in your inbox right now.

If not, you can sign up right here.

"What is an Oddball Stock?" with Nate Tobik on SNN Network

Nate had an appearance on SNN Network talking about our recent post, "What is an Oddball Stock?"